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Teacher Interventions-To-Go Series
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School-Wide Strategies for Managing...
HYPERACTIVITY

Hyperactive students tend to have a very high energy level, act impulsively and can be behaviorally distracting. They may fidget, play with objects, tap pencils so loudly against their desk that kids from across the room look over at them, or blurt out answers to teacher questions before the instructor is even finished asking them. When working with students who are hyperactive or impulsive, teachers should keep in mind that these students are very often completely unaware that others view their behavior as distracting or annoying. Teachers working with such children can greatly increase their own effectiveness by clearly communicating behavioral expectations to students, by encouraging and rewarding students who behave appropriately, and by being consistent and fair when responding to problem student behaviors. Here are teacher ideas for managing impulsive or hyperactive students who display problem motor or verbal behaviors:

Jim's Recommended Internet Resources for...
HYPERACTIVITY

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Prepared by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), this 49-page booklet provides an excellent introduction to the disorder. It provides a basic definition of ADHD, outlines areas of child functioning affected by the disorder, and discusses common treatments. A great resource to share with teachers and parents. ||Report Broken Link

Identifying and Treating ADHD. If you are looking for a good introduction to ADHD and its impact on children, this 22-page booklet from the U.S. Department of Education is worth checking out. It includes some basic but very appropriate ideas for managing behaviors associated with ADHD. ||Report Broken Link

Strategies for Teaching Youth With ADD and ADHD. This webpage contains a number of ideas to manage problem individual ADHD behaviors as well as tips for structuring the classroom environment to maximize learning for children with ADHD. It was written by Dr. Tom McIntyre, a professor of special education at Hunter College, City University of New York. Also, visit Tom's excellent intervention website at http://www.behavioradvisor.com. ||Report Broken Link

Whole-Class Self-Monitoring. Fred Roemer, a teacher at Pinellas Park Elementary School (FL), has put online a terrific description of his classwide self-monitoring program. The beauty of this intervention idea is that it helps all children to develop good behavior habits but does not single out individual 'at-risk' students unfairly. This is an ideal group intervention if you have one or more overactive students in your classroom! ||Report Broken Link

References

Brock, S.E.(1998, February). Helping the student with ADHD in the classroom Strategies for teachers. Communiqué, 26 (5), 18-20.

DuPaul & Stoner, 2002 DuPaul, G.J., & Stoner, G. (2002). Interventions for attention problems. In M. Shinn, H.M. Walker, & G. Stoner (Eds.) Interventions for academic and behavioral problems II: Preventive and remedial approaches (pp. 913-938). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.

DuPaul, G.J., & Stoner, G. (2002). Interventions for attention problems. In M. Shinn, H.M. Walker, & G. Stoner (Eds.) Interventions for academic and behavioral problems II: Preventive and remedial approaches (pp. 913-938). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.

Kerr, M. M., & Nelson, C. M. (1998). Strategies for managing behavior problems in the classroom. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Martens, B.K., & Meller, P.J. (1990). The application of behavioral principles to educational settings. In T.B. Gutkin & C.R.Reynolds (Eds.), The handbook of school psychology (2nd ed.) (pp. 612-634). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Sprick, R. S., Borgmeier, C., & Nolet, V. (2002). Prevention and management of behavior problems in secondary schools. In M. R. Shinn, H. M. Walker, & G. Stoner (Eds.). Interventions for academic and behavior problems II: Preventive and remedial approaches (pp. 373-401). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.

U.S. Department of Education (2004). Teaching children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Instructional strategies and practices. Retrieved August 20, 2005, from http://www.ed.gov/teachers/needs/speced/adhd/adhd-resource-pt2.doc

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